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WRITERS' DAY 2014 -- Registration Now Closed

 

What is Writers' Day?

Writers' Day is the region's largest writing conference, attracting bestselling authors, award winners, laureates, and more. In 2014, we welcome B.A. Shapiro, best-selling author of The Art Forger, as our keynote speaker. We have also expanded our offerings to four sessions of all-new workshops and seminars led by an incredible line-up of professional writers, editors, agents, and publishers. The conference now includes the option of face-to-face manuscript critiques and agent/publisher one-on-one pitch sessions. The day will be followed by the New Hampshire Literary Awards ceremony. Both events are hosted by Southern NH University.

Writers' Day is brought to you in part by a grant from the NH State Council on the Arts and Southern NH University. Thank you also to Gibson's Bookstore and the NH Institute of Art. The NH Literary Awards are sponsored by the Lincoln Financial Foundation and Southern NH University. Thank you to the Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation, who provides a major grant for NHWP's programming throughout the year.

When: Saturday, March 22, 2014 -- 8am to 5:30pm

Where: Southern New Hampshire University (SNHU)

Staying over? Book your room at Fairfield Inn & Suites, only minutes away from campus. Call 603-606-5485. Be sure to mention NHWP/Writers' Day for a special discount. Only $89 per night for a King size bed or $94 per night for two Queen size beds. Book by March 14.

Admission rates:

  • NHWP Member: $175
  • Non-Member: $205 (includes automatic one-year membership to the NH Writers' Project)

NOTE: Any refunds from this point forward must be credited to future events, workshops, or NHWP membership. Also, in addition to the conference offerings, there are agent/publisher pitch sessions and manuscript critiques. Instructions on these options work are below with the agent/publisher biographies.

  • Pitch Session: +$25 (must be registered for Writers' Day to participate)
  • Manuscript Critique +$100 (must be registered for Writers' Day to participate)

How to register in three easy steps:

  1. Peruse the schedule below. For each of the four session blocks, jot down the number and letter (e.g. "1A") for the session you would like to attend. If you are adding a pitch session or manuscript critique, then read over the extra instructions and make note of the agent or publisher you wish to schedule.
  2. Choose a lunch option below.
  3. Scroll back here. Click the register button below and input your selections. Have questions about the event? Contact Writers' Day coordinator Amy Suchocki at amy.nhwp "at" gmail.com

 

Schedule

8 a.m.                         Registration


8:50 a.m.                    Welcome


9 a.m.                         Keynote address by B.A. Shapiro


9:40 a.m.                    Book signing with B.A. Shapiro

10 - 11:15 a.m.          Session 1 (A-H)

11:30 - 12:45 a.m.     Session 2 (I-P)

1 - 1:45 p.m.              Networking lunch with reading by the statewide Three-Minute Fiction Slam winner

2 - 3 p.m.                   Session 3 (Q-X) and Pitch Sessions

3:15 - 4:15 p.m.         Session 4 (Y-FF) and Manuscript Critique Sessions

4:30 - 5:30 p.m.         New Hampshire Literary Awards ceremony

KEYNOTE SPEAKER:  B.A. SHAPIRO

B.A. Shapiro is the author of six novels (The Art Forger, The Safe Room, Blind Spot, See No Evil, Blameless and Shattered Echoes), four screenplays (Blind Spot, The Lost Coven, Borderline and Shattered Echoes) and the non-fiction book, The Big Squeeze. In her previous career incarnations, she has directed research projects for a residential substance abuse facility, worked as a systems analyst/statistician, headed the Boston office of a software development firm, and served as an adjunct professor teaching sociology at Tufts University and creative writing at Northeastern University. She likes being a novelist the best.

She began her writing career when she quit her high-pressure job after the birth of her second child. Nervous about what to do next, she said to her mother, "If I'm not playing at being superwoman anymore, I don't know who I am." Her mother answered with the question: "If you had one year to live, how would you want to spend it?" The answer: write a novel and spend more time with her children. And that's exactly what she did. Smart mother. After writing six novels and raising her children, she now lives in Boston with her husband Dan and dog Sagan.  http://bashapirobooks.com

 Session 1 – Choose One

1A  MEET THE KEYNOTE:  B.A. SHAPIRO

Join keynote speaker and bestselling author B.A. Shapiro for a discussion on the challenges of writing novels.  She will touch upon her own writing process, the craft of writing, and field questions from the audience.  Be enlightened and inspired by the author of The Art Forger which was called "inventive and entertaining" by the Boston Globe, "a gripping novel" by O: The Oprah Magazine, and "an addictive thriller" by Redbook. 

1B  TURNING FAMILY HISTORY INTO FICTION with Henriette Lazaridis Power (Repeats in the second session)

Everybody has a story, but not every story makes sense as a narrative. For that, you need revision, editing, and invention. This class will teach students how to shape the facts of a family story into exciting, tension-filled fiction. We will discuss the key elements of narrative, and then students will do brainstorming/worksheet work on their own family stories to identify the ways in which they can turn their facts into good fiction. By the end of the class, students will have a better sense of what to keep, lose, or change. They will have a rough beginning and a clearer way forward for their narratives. Students should come to class with notes for their own family story.

Henriette Lazaridis Power's debut novel The Clover House was published by Ballantine Books in April 2013 and was a Boston Globe best-seller and a Target Emerging Authors pick. She holds degrees in English from Middlebury College, Oxford University where she was a Rhodes Scholar, and the University of Pennsylvania. After earning her Ph.D., she taught at Harvard for ten years. Her work has appeared in publications including Narrative Magazine, Salamander, the New England Review, The Millions, The New York Times online, and the Huffington Post, and has earned her a Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist Grant and honors from Glimmer Train and the William Faulkner/William Wisdom Novel-in-Progress contest. She is the founding editor of The Drum, an online literary magazine publishing short fiction and essays exclusively in audio form. A competitive rower, Power trains regularly on the Charles River in Boston.  http://henriettepower.com

1C  THE TWISTS AND TURNS ON THE ROAD TO PUBLICATION: A WRITER’S JOURNEY with Katharine Britton (Repeats in the second session)

Ever wonder what happens after your agent sells your book? Discuss with fellow aspiring novelists the role of the editor, advances, revisions, copyediting, blurbs, the sales staff, cover art, first-pass pages, galleys, proofreaders, distribution, front matter, reviews, and finally marketing, marketing, marketing.  Don’t yet have an agent? We can discuss that too. Bring your questions. 

Katharine Britton has written two novels, Her Sister’s Shadow (2011) and Little Island (2013) both from Berkley Books (Penguin, USA). Katharine has a Master’s degree in Creative Writing from Dartmouth College, and a Master’s in Education from the University of Vermont. Her screenplay, “Goodbye Don’t Mean Gone,” was a Moondance Film Festival winner and a finalist in the New England Women in Film and Television contest. Katharine has taught at ILEAD, Colby-Sawyer College, and The Writer’s Center in White River Junction. When not at her desk, Katharine can often be found in her garden waging a non-toxic war against the slugs, snails, deer, woodchucks, chipmunks, moles, voles, and beetles with whom she shares her yard. Katharine’s defense consists mainly of hand-wringing, after the fact.  www.katharinebritton.com

1D  LOCKING IN THE FIRST PAGES with Michelle Hoover (Repeats in the second session)

The opening pages of your novel or nonfiction book either make or break the readers’ interest, not to mention the interest of agents and editors. But how do you get a story going when there is so much a reader needs to know about your characters, their relationships, and their past? This course will help you discover where to begin your novel—using concepts such as the Wounding Event, the Inciting Incident, and the Point of Attack—how to deal with backstory, how to raise the stakes on your protagonist’s actions, and how to make us care about those actions. By the end of the course, you will have a better idea of where to begin and how best to make that beginning both interesting and meaningful. 

Michelle Hoover teaches writing at Boston University and Grub Street. She was a finalist for the Dorothy Churchill Cappon Essay Prize and has published short stories and novel excerpts in numerous journals, including Prairie Schooner, The Massachusetts Review, Confrontation, and StoryQuarterly. She has been the Philip Roth Writer-in-Residence at Bucknell University, a MacDowell Fellow, and the 2005 winner of the PEN/New England Discovery Award for Fiction. Her work has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize and published in Best New American Voices. Her debut novel, The Quickening, was shortlisted for the Center for Fiction’s Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel Prize, was a Finalist for the Indies Choice Debut of 2010 and Forward magazine’s Best Literary Book of 2010, and is a 2010 Massachusetts Book Award “Must Read” pick.  www.michelle-hoover.com

1E  EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW TO WRITE A MEMOIR with Michael Charney (Repeats in the second session)

Have that hidden story you’ve always wanted to tell? Have an idea that you’ve procrastinated about for years?Michael will talk about writing and publishing his memoir and how he helped develop Carrie Cariello’s book, WHAT COLOR IS MONDAY?: How Autism Changed One Family for the Better--and then published it to very strong reviews.  There will be hints, tips, and do’s-and-don’ts so that attendees will walk away with practical ideas. Learn all you need to know about getting your memoir from a dream to a published book from the owner of Riddle Brook Publishing.

Michael Charney is the author of a memoir, Chasing Glenn Beck: A Personal Experiment in Reclaiming our Hijacked Political Conversation, and an essay collection, Tea with the Mad Hatter: Musings on Politics, The Tea Party, and America's Rampant Electile Dysfunction. He has also written and published more than two dozen short stories, essays and technical articles covering topics that range from mainstream fiction to science fiction, technology, and even education. He has won awards for both his fiction and nonfiction, and was nominated for a Pushcart Prize for his short story, "Moths." Most recently, Michael had a short-short story accepted in Amoskeag: The Literary Journal of Southern New Hampshire University. Michael has his master’s degree in English with a concentration in Creative Writing from William Paterson University, and an undergraduate degree from UC Berkeley. He is also the owner of Riddle Brook Publishing, an independent publishing company based here in New Hampshire. Riddle Brook focuses exclusively on narrative nonfiction and memoir. www.riddlebrookpublishing.com

1F CHARMED CAREER… I DON'T THINK SO with JoAnn Adinolfi (Repeats in the second session)

Learn from my mistakes as a children’s book author and illustrator. I have worked for major publishing houses, had agents, have been at the top of my career and at the bottom and everything else in between. Let’s talk about the ups and downs of the creative professional, the creative process and how to get your career up and going in the digital age.

JoAnn Adinolfi was born and raised on Staten Island, New York and now lives in Portsmouth.  She is the author-illustrator of Tina’s Diner (Simon & Schuster) and the illustrator of over twenty-five books for children including The Perfect Thanksgiving by Eileen Spinelli (Henry Holt), Leaping Lizards by Stuart Murphy (HarperCollins), I Want Your Moo by Marcella Bakur Weiner and Jill Neimark (Magination Press), Alfie the Apostrophe by Moira Rose Donohue (Albert Whitman), Here Comes Silent e by Anna Jane Hays (Random House Step into Reading) and Halloween Hoots and Howls by Joan Horton (Square Fish). The New York Times has said of her work: “The art is high-spirited and fanciful as well. JoAnn Adinolfi uses bright watercolors, pastel pencils and a captivatingly antic style.” www.joannadinolfi.com

1G CIRCLES, LINES, & NEGATIVE SPACE: SHAPING UP YOUR POEMS with Alice B. Fogel (Repeats in the second session)

What if we considered the white field of the page an integral element of our poems? What would happen if we detached ourselves from the left hand margin? What is at stake in a poem’s verbal and spatial line breaks? All these not-merely-visual elements have an effect on the recursive or circular nature of how we take in—or create—pacing, rhythm, tension or suspense, even meaning and emotion, as we read.  We will look at what some poets do in creatively shaping their poems, and how you might sculpt yours in new ways too. 

Alice B. Fogel is the current NH State Poet Laureate. She is the author of Strange Terrain, which helps readers know they can appreciate poetry without necessarily “getting” it, and Be That Empty, a bestselling poetry book in 2008. A recipient of an Individual Artist Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts and 6-time Pushcart nominee, her work has appeared in The Best American Poetry series, former Poet Laureate Robert Hass’s “Poet’s Choice,” and other anthologies and journals. A new book, Interval: Poems Based on Bach’s Goldberg Variations won the Nicholas Schaffner Award for Music in Literature, and is forthcoming in 2015. She teaches at Keene State and Landmark Colleges.  www.alicebfogel.com

1H  BOOK TRAILER BOOT CAMP with Susan Ann Wall (Repeats in the second session)

Are you dying to market your book with a video trailer but don’t know how? Well, PowerPoint isn’t just for presentations. In the 2010 version, you can save your file as a video, making this the perfect tool to create book trailers without having to buy and learn new software. In this workshop, we’ll explore the different features in PowerPoint 2010 that are essential in creating a book trailer video. We’ll also discuss key considerations for creating a book trailer including use of media (clip art, photos, music) and how to publish your trailer as a video.

Susan Ann Wall is the author of four self-published contemporary romance novels under the name S.A. Wall as well as one erotic novella and one erotic novelette under the pseudonym Ann Victor. As an independent author, Susan has learned to use different marketing techniques on a tight budget, including how to create book trailers using what you have. She has created over a dozen book trailers using PowerPoint 2010, using a variety of techniques. These trailers have increased traffic to her author Facebook pages, Web sites, and You Tube page. Susan is Microsoft Office Specialist Master certified and holds a Master of Arts in Education in Curriculum and Instruction. She has made a living for many years as an instructor and instructional designer. She has taught Microsoft courses for organizations large and small including Lockheed Martin, the National Security Agency, Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, CompUSA, the U.S. Navy, the NH chapter of Romance Writers of America, and to small business owners through White Mountains Community College. Susan has also taught and shared marketing techniques to small business owners through workshops and personalized consulting. http://susanannwall.wordpress.com

Session 2 - Choose One

2I  THE INSIDE SCOOP: HOW TO FIND THE BEST LITERARY AGENT FOR YOU with Katherine Flynn

As a literary agent, Katherine Flynn considers hundreds of submissions every week. In this workshop, she will demystify the agent’s role and process in selecting new authors and will share insider information on how to best present yourself to an agent or editor, whatever your level of publishing experience. We’ll look at the basic elements of a pitch, or “query” letter, learn what agents and editors look for, talk about ways to tailor pitches to specific people or places, and examine real query letters and first pages that have worked. We’ll discuss top mistakes that writers make and we’ll get your submission to a place where it will grab the attention of a busy editor or agent. There will be a Q&A session at the end of this seminar where you can ask specific questions.

Katherine Flynn joined the Kneerim, Williams & Bloom Literary Agency in 2008. After graduating from Johns Hopkins University, Katherine worked at the literary agency of Nicholas Ellison/Sanford J. Greenburger Associates, Inc. in New York. She then pursued her Ph.D. in History at Brown University, where she is now A.B.D. Prior to joining Kneerim, Williams & Bloom, Katherine edited history books at the publishing company of Bedford/St. Martin’s. She has also taught English literature and composition to high school students and has worked in a rare book shop. Katherine represents history, biography, politics/current affairs, adventure, nature, pop culture, and the occasional health and fitness topic for non-fiction and particularly loves exciting narrative nonfiction, where the truth is a story more fascinating than anything else. For fiction, she represents both literary and commercial fiction of all kinds.  www.kwblit.com

2J  TURNING FAMILY HISTORY INTO FICTION with Henriette Lazaridis Power (Repeats in the first session)

Everybody has a story, but not every story makes sense as a narrative. For that, you need revision, editing, and invention. This class will teach students how to shape the facts of a family story into exciting, tension-filled fiction. We will discuss the key elements of narrative, and then students will do brainstorming/worksheet work on their own family stories to identify the ways in which they can turn their facts into good fiction. By the end of the class, students will have a better sense of what to keep, lose, or change. They will have a rough beginning and a clearer way forward for their narratives. Students should come to class with notes for their own family story.

Henriette Lazaridis Power's debut novel The Clover House was published by Ballantine Books in April 2013 and was a Boston Globe best-seller and a Target Emerging Authors pick. She holds degrees in English from Middlebury College, Oxford University where she was a Rhodes Scholar, and the University of Pennsylvania. After earning her Ph.D., she taught at Harvard for ten years. Her work has appeared in publications including Narrative Magazine, Salamander, the New England Review, The Millions, The New York Times online, and the Huffington Post, and has earned her a Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist Grant and honors from Glimmer Train and the William Faulkner/William Wisdom Novel-in-Progress contest. She is the founding editor of The Drum, an online literary magazine publishing short fiction and essays exclusively in audio form. A competitive rower, Power trains regularly on the Charles River in Boston.  http://henriettepower.com

2K  THE TWISTS AND TURNS ON THE ROAD TO PUBLICATION: A WRITER’S JOURNEY with Katharine Britton (Repeats in the first session)

Ever wonder what happens after your agent sells your book? Discuss with fellow aspiring novelists the role of the editor, advances, revisions, copyediting, blurbs, the sales staff, cover art, first-pass pages, galleys, proofreaders, distribution, front matter, reviews, and finally marketing, marketing, marketing.  Don’t yet have an agent? We can discuss that too. Bring your questions. 

Katharine Britton has written two novels, Her Sister’s Shadow (2011) and Little Island (2013) both from Berkley Books (Penguin, USA). Katharine has a Master’s degree in Creative Writing from Dartmouth College, and a Master’s in Education from the University of Vermont. Her screenplay, “Goodbye Don’t Mean Gone,” was a Moondance Film Festival winner and a finalist in the New England Women in Film and Television contest. Katharine has taught at ILEAD, Colby-Sawyer College, and The Writer’s Center in White River Junction. When not at her desk, Katharine can often be found in her garden waging a non-toxic war against the slugs, snails, deer, woodchucks, chipmunks, moles, voles, and beetles with whom she shares her yard. Katharine’s defense consists mainly of hand-wringing, after the fact.  www.katharinebritton.com

2L  LOCKING IN THE FIRST PAGES with Michelle Hoover (Repeats in the first session)

The opening pages of your novel or nonfiction book either make or break the readers’ interest, not to mention the interest of agents and editors. But how do you get a story going when there is so much a reader needs to know about your characters, their relationships, and their past? This course will help you discover where to begin your novel—using concepts such as the Wounding Event, the Inciting Incident, and the Point of Attack—how to deal with backstory, how to raise the stakes on your protagonist’s actions, and how to make us care about those actions. By the end of the course, you will have a better idea of where to begin and how best to make that beginning both interesting and meaningful. 

Michelle Hoover teaches writing at Boston University and Grub Street. She was a finalist for the Dorothy Churchill Cappon Essay Prize and has published short stories and novel excerpts in numerous journals, including Prairie Schooner, The Massachusetts Review, Confrontation, and StoryQuarterly. She has been the Philip Roth Writer-in-Residence at Bucknell University, a MacDowell Fellow, and the 2005 winner of the PEN/New England Discovery Award for Fiction. Her work has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize and published in Best New American Voices. Her debut novel, The Quickening, was shortlisted for the Center for Fiction’s Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel Prize, was a Finalist for the Indies Choice Debut of 2010 and Forward magazine’s Best Literary Book of 2010, and is a 2010 Massachusetts Book Award “Must Read” pick.  www.michelle-hoover.com

2M  EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW TO WRITE A MEMOIR with Michael Charney (Repeats in the first session)

Have that hidden story you’ve always wanted to tell? Have an idea that you’ve procrastinated about for years?Michael will talk about writing and publishing his memoir and how he helped develop Carrie Cariello’s book, WHAT COLOR IS MONDAY?: How Autism Changed One Family for the Better--and then published it to very strong reviews.  There will be hints, tips, and do’s-and-don’ts so that attendees will walk away with practical ideas. Learn all you need to know about getting your memoir from a dream to a published book from the owner of Riddle Brook Publishing.

Michael Charney is the author of a memoir, Chasing Glenn Beck: A Personal Experiment in Reclaiming our Hijacked Political Conversation, and an essay collection, Tea with the Mad Hatter: Musings on Politics, The Tea Party, and America's Rampant Electile Dysfunction. He has also written and published more than two dozen short stories, essays and technical articles covering topics that range from mainstream fiction to science fiction, technology, and even education. He has won awards for both his fiction and nonfiction, and was nominated for a Pushcart Prize for his short story, "Moths." Most recently, Michael had a short-short story accepted in Amoskeag: The Literary Journal of Southern New Hampshire University. Michael has his master’s degree in English with a concentration in Creative Writing from William Paterson University, and an undergraduate degree from UC Berkeley. He is also the owner of Riddle Brook Publishing, an independent publishing company based here in New Hampshire. Riddle Brook focuses exclusively on narrative nonfiction and memoir. www.riddlebrookpublishing.com

2N CHARMED CAREER… I DON'T THINK SO with JoAnn Adinolfi (Repeats in the first session)

Learn from my mistakes as a children’s book author and illustrator. I have worked for major publishing houses, had agents, have been at the top of my career and at the bottom and everything else in between. Let’s talk about the ups and downs of the creative professional, the creative process and how to get your career up and going in the digital age.

JoAnn Adinolfi was born and raised on Staten Island, New York and now lives in Portsmouth.  She is the author-illustrator of Tina’s Diner (Simon & Schuster) and the illustrator of over twenty-five books for children including The Perfect Thanksgiving by Eileen Spinelli (Henry Holt), Leaping Lizards by Stuart Murphy (HarperCollins), I Want Your Moo by Marcella Bakur Weiner and Jill Neimark (Magination Press), Alfie the Apostrophe by Moira Rose Donohue (Albert Whitman), Here Comes Silent e by Anna Jane Hays (Random House Step into Reading) and Halloween Hoots and Howls by Joan Horton (Square Fish). The New York Times has said of her work: “The art is high-spirited and fanciful as well. JoAnn Adinolfi uses bright watercolors, pastel pencils and a captivatingly antic style.”  www.joannadinolfi.com

2O CIRCLES, LINES, & NEGATIVE SPACE: SHAPING UP YOUR POEMS with Alice B. Fogel (Repeats in the first session)

What if we considered the white field of the page an integral element of our poems? What would happen if we detached ourselves from the left hand margin? What is at stake in a poem’s verbal and spatial line breaks? All these not-merely-visual elements have an effect on the recursive or circular nature of how we take in—or create—pacing, rhythm, tension or suspense, even meaning and emotion, as we read.  We will look at what some poets do in creatively shaping their poems, and how you might sculpt yours in new ways too. 

Alice B. Fogel is the current NH State Poet Laureate. She is the author of Strange Terrain, which helps readers know they can appreciate poetry without necessarily “getting” it, and Be That Empty, a bestselling poetry book in 2008. A recipient of an Individual Artist Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts and 6-time Pushcart nominee, her work has appeared in The Best American Poetry series, former Poet Laureate Robert Hass’s “Poet’s Choice,” and other anthologies and journals. A new book, Interval: Poems Based on Bach’s Goldberg Variations won the Nicholas Schaffner Award for Music in Literature, and is forthcoming in 2015. She teaches at Keene State and Landmark Colleges.  www.alicebfogel.com

2P  BOOK TRAILER BOOT CAMP with Susan Ann Wall (Repeats in the first session)

Are you dying to market your book with a video trailer but don’t know how? Well, PowerPoint isn’t just for presentations. In the 2010 version, you can save your file as a video, making this the perfect tool to create book trailers without having to buy and learn new software. In this workshop, we’ll explore the different features in PowerPoint 2010 that are essential in creating a book trailer video. We’ll also discuss key considerations for creating a book trailer including use of media (clip art, photos, music) and how to publish your trailer as a video.

Susan Ann Wall is the author of four self-published contemporary romance novels under the name S.A. Wall as well as one erotic novella and one erotic novelette under the pseudonym Ann Victor. As an independent author, Susan has learned to use different marketing techniques on a tight budget, including how to create book trailers using what you have. She has created over a dozen book trailers using PowerPoint 2010, using a variety of techniques. These trailers have increased traffic to her author Facebook pages, Web sites, and You Tube page. Susan is Microsoft Office Specialist Master certified and holds a Master of Arts in Education in Curriculum and Instruction. She has made a living for many years as an instructor and instructional designer. She has taught Microsoft courses for organizations large and small including Lockheed Martin, the National Security Agency, Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, CompUSA, the U.S. Navy, the NH chapter of Romance Writers of America, and to small business owners through White Mountains Community College. Susan has also taught and shared marketing techniques to small business owners through workshops and personalized consulting. http://susanannwall.wordpress.com

Lunch - Choose One

L1 Turkey Cheddar BLT Wrap  Turkey, bacon, and cheddar with mayonnaise, lettuce, tomato wrapped in a flour tortilla. Served with potato salad, freshly baked cookies, and bottled water.

L2 Roast Beef Deli Sandwich  Roast beef and Provolone cheese on whole wheat bread with lettuce and tomato. Served with potato salad, freshly baked cookies, and bottled water.

L3 Roasted Veggie Club Sandwich  Roasted eggplant, zucchini, and red peppers with fresh Mozzarella and artichoke tapenade on Ciabatta. Served with potato salad, freshly baked cookies, and bottled water.

L4 Garden Salad  Julienne of buffet ham, breast of turkey, Swiss cheese, and cheddar cheese over a bed of mixed greens with tomato wedges, hard boiled egg slices, ripe olives, with Italian dressing. Served with Pita bread, freshly baked cookies, and bottled water.

L5 Grilled Chicken Caesar Salad  Julienne of grilled breast of chicken on a bed of Romaine lettuce topped with croutons, grated Parmesan cheese, and traditional Caesar dressing. Served with Pita bread, freshly baked cookies, and bottled water.

L6 Grilled Steak Salad  Strips of marinated grilled steak on a bed of Romaine lettuce topped with croutons, grated Parmesan cheese, and Bleu Cheese dressing. Served with Pita bread, freshly baked cookies, and bottled water.

Session 3 – Choose One

3Q  PLOTTING WITHOUT MAKING YOURSELF CRAZY: THOUGHTS ON TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES FOR PLOTTING with Toby Ball (Repeats in the fourth session)

You’ve heard the buzzwords: three act structure, narrative arc, character arc, pacing, premise, climax, peaks and valleys, outlining, mind-mapping, conflict development, internal and external conflict, and so on. Plotting a novel is difficult work, and bookstores and the Internet are rife with different, often contradictory, advice on how to approach it. This workshop will sort through different techniques and tools that help writers create and manage plot and suggest strategies that have worked for the presenter.

Toby Ball is the author of two critically acclaimed suspense novels, The Vaults and Scorch City. His third novel, Invisible Streets, will be published by Overlook Press in July. He was born in Washington, DC, grew up in Syracuse, NY, and attended Trinity College (CT). He has had stints in journalism (Congressional Quarterly), education (one memorable year as a high school social studies teacher), and nonprofits (the Carbon Coalition among others). He is now the Business Manager at the Crimes against Children Research Center and the Family Research Laboratory at the University of New Hampshire. He lives in Durham, NH, with his wife and two children.  http://tobyball.com

3R  REVISIONS—YOU DO GET A SECOND CHANCE TO MAKE A FIRST IMPRESSION with Jessie Crockett (Repeats in the fourth session)

Revisions don’t have to be painful, punitive or procrastinated. In fact, they can be the most creative and enjoyable part of the writing process. In this workshop we’ll discuss strategies and techniques to help you to pull that languishing first draft out of a drawer and to take it to the next level. We will also discuss positive ways to acknowledge and make the best use of your inner critic. Come find out how you can learn to love the second, third and even tenth draft of your work.

Jessie Crockett’s latest novel Drizzled With Death is the first in her Sugar Grove Mysteries series published by Berkley.  When not working on her next murderous adventure, she enthusiastically combs the beach, designs bento lunches, and throws parties. She delights in mentoring young writers at local schools.  Her debut mystery, Live Free Or Die, was the 2011 winner of the Daphne DuMaurier Award for Mainstream Mystery.  www.jessiecrockett.com

3S  STRUCTURE AS SPRINGBOARD IN LITERARY SHORT FICTION with Mary Elizabeth Pope (Repeats in the fourth session)

This presentation will focus on one commonly employed structure for a story that conference attendees can follow themselves, providing helpful guidelines to work within, using examples by authors Rebecca Wells, Elizabeth Gilbert, Alejandro Ramirez, and Melissa Bank. This topic comes from years of working with students who find fiction writing assignments too open-ended and desire limitations that ironically free them to be more creative.  

Mary Elizabeth Pope is the author of a collection of short fiction entitled Divining Venus: Stories (The Waywiser Press, 2013, Distributed by Dufour Editions.) Her short stories and essays have also appeared in Florida Review, Sycamore Review, Ascent, Passages North, PMS: PoemMemoirStory, among others, as well as the anthologies The Fourth Genre: Contemporary Writers of/on Creative Nonfiction (Pearson) and Peninsula: Essays and Memoirs from Michigan (Michigan State University Press).  She holds a Ph.D. in English and Creative Writing from University of Iowa, and is currently an associate professor of English and Creative Writing at Emmanuel College in Boston.  http://waywiser-press.com/pope.html

3T  THE ART OF THE INTERVIEW with Mark Dagostino (Repeats in the fourth session)

Sitting down for an interview with a perfect stranger — whether it’s an interesting neighbor right here in New Hampshire or one of the biggest celebrities on the planet — should not be a nerve-wracking task! Journalists, authors and writers of all sorts will glean insight into the art of the relaxed, conversational interview style that Mark Dagostino uses to open doors to revealing conversations. Through the example of Mark’s own local history at The New Hampshire Weekly Section of The Boston Globe, his decade-plus spent at People magazine, and his current career as a co-author of big-name biographies, established journalists and aspiring writers alike will walk away with knowledge they can use to help unlock their own unique interview styles — along with important tips on how to establish an instant, easygoing, trusting rapport with almost anyone.

Mark Dagostino is a New York Times bestselling co-author and a 10-year veteran of People magazine. From humble beginnings at the University of New Hampshire, an internship at the Derry News, and an early freelance career with The Boston Globe’s New Hampshire Weekly section, Mark parlayed his news-gathering and feature-writing abilities into a decade on staff at the most successful celebrity/pop-culture newsmagazine on the planet—rising from correspondent, to columnist to Senior Writer at People during a remarkable odyssey through L.A. and N.Y.C. In addition to covering the aftermath of 9/11 and The Miracle on the Hudson, Mark had a knack for drawing revealing interviews and establishing trusted relationships with the likes of Donald Trump, Lindsay Lohan, The Olsen Twins, Jennifer Lopez, Justin Timberlake, Rosie O’Donnell, Whoopi Goldberg, and more. Today, he’s proud to write books that cover a wide array of subjects, from Hulk Hogan’s My Life Outside the Ring, to the memoir of 2012 Presidential hopeful, Gov. Tim Pawlenty; from General Rick Lynch’s Adapt or Die: Leadership Principles from an American General, to Love Boat actor Gavin MacLeod’s new memoir, This is Your Captain Speaking. He is currently at work on the gripping memoir of Tonya Craft, the former schoolteacher who overcame a modern-day witch trial of false accusations both in and out of a small-town Georgia courtroom. 

3U  INSPIRATION, THICK SKIN AND UGLY LUCK: ONE AUTHOR’S JOURNEY FROM NOVEL IDEA TO A PUBLISHED SERIES with Paul Durham (Repeats in the fourth session)

The road to publication can be a long one, combining frantic stretches of creative energy with extended periods of “wait-and-see.”  Join Paul Durham as he walks you through his three year journey from the genesis of an idea for a novel, to finding an agent and publisher, to a real time discussion of the final days leading up to the April 2014 publication of the first book in his debut series, The Luck Uglies. This workshop emphasizes inspiration as well as some key nuts and bolts of the publishing process. Topics include powering through your first draft; taking a targeted and strategic approach to finding the agent who is right for you; working with your editor and marketing team; and tackling the challenge of drafting a second book in a series before the first has been published. Above all, it is about staying inspired and never losing sight of the most important element of that process—your writing. 

Paul Durham's debut novel, The Luck Uglies, is coming out in April, 2014.  It is the first book in a middle grade trilogy to be published by HarperCollins.  Paul was raised in Massachusetts and attended college and law school in Boston. He now lives in Exeter with his wife, two daughters and an enormous, bushy creature the local animal shelter identified as a cat. He writes in an abandoned chicken coop at the edge of a swamp and keeps a tiny porcelain frog in his pocket for good luck.  www.pauldurhambooks.com  or  www.facebook.com/pauldurhambooks

3V FROM WRITERS’ DAY TO THE BOOKSTORE SHELF – FINDING YOUR WRITE PATH with Kasey Mathews and Karen Kenney (Repeats in the fourth session)

Writers Kasey Mathews and Karen Kenney share their own Writers’ Day success stories and will help you find your own way to success. Karen and Kasey are at different points in their own writing careers, representative of the spectrum of writers attending Writers’ Day. They will talk about the successful connections they’ve made through the New Hampshire Writers’ Project and describe how Kasey completed her manuscript and found a publisher.  They will also offer tools and techniques to help participants create their own paths to success.

Kasey Mathews is the author of Preemie: Lessons in Love, Life and Motherhood (Hatherleigh Press, 2012). Five years ago she showed up alone at her first Writers’ Day with a handwritten manuscript and the dream of a published book. That day she and a few fellow writers formed the writing group that would steer Kasey toward an editor, agent, and eventually, a publisher.  www.kaseymathews.com

Karen Kenney is a writer, yoga teacher, and spiritual mentor. Her writing journey began years ago but really flourished when she attended her first Writers’ Day. From there, she attended Ann Hood’s NHWP workshop, where she met fellow writers, joined a writing group, and was encouraged to submit to the Eckerd College Writer’s Conference founded by Dennis Lehane. She’s currently at work on a memoir.  http://karenkenney.com

3W LEAPING POETRY: THE LOGIC OF THE SURREAL with Andrew Merton (Repeats in the fourth session)

Wislawa Szymborska writes of a woman in a desperate contest to outlive her own dress. Mark Strand writes of a man and a camel singing a beautiful duet, which the clumsy narrator ruins. Charles Simic and William Stafford write of the inner lives of stones. In one of my own poems a lion in a New England diner talks longingly of the veldt; in another the narrator disguises himself as an inkstand. The spectrum of free verse poetry, ranging from narrative realism through more imagistic and impressionistic work to the surreal, is similar to the spectrum of painting; each type can be lovely and affecting in its own way. To read and write surreal poetry--what the poet Robert Bly calls “leaping poetry”--requires the poet to loosen his or her hold on everyday, linear logic, to let intuition reign. In this workshop, we will read surrealistic poems and explore pathways to their mysterious hiding places in our pscyhes.

Andrew Merton’s book of poems, Evidence that We Are Descended from Chairs, was published by Accents Publishing in 2012. His poetry has appeared in Bellevue Literary Review, Alaska Quarterly Journal, Comstock Review, Silk Road, Third Wednesday, The American Journal of Nursing, The Rialto (U.K.) and elsewhere. His journalism and essays have appeared in The New York Times Magazine, Esquire, Ms. Magazine, Boston Magazine and elsewhere. He teaches writing at the University of New Hampshire.  www.andrewmertonpoetry.com

3X TEN MISTAKES I’VE MADE IN MY WRITING CAREER SO THAT YOU DON’T HAVE TO with Elaine Isaak (Repeats in the fourth session)

New writers eagerly look forward to selling their first novel—but are often unprepared for the roller coaster of a writing career: getting and losing an offer, getting and losing a publisher, getting and losing an agent—what else could possibly go wrong? This talk gives first-time and aspiring authors a chance to learn about some of the pitfalls that await on the pathway to publication—and how to avoid them!

Elaine Isaak is the author of The Singer’s Crown and its sequels.  As E. C. Ambrose, she wrote Elisha Barber(DAW, 2013), first of "The Dark Apostle" historical fantasy series about medieval surgery. Elaine quite enjoys her alternate identity, aside from a desire to start arguments with herself on social media.  In addition to fiction, she has written how-to articles for the Writer Magazine, and non-fiction at Clarkesworld, taught at the Odyssey Speculative Fiction Workshop, and spoken to writers’ groups across the country.  Under any name, you still do NOT want to be her hero.  www.TheDarkApostle.com

Session 4 – Choose One

4Y  PLOTTING WITHOUT MAKING YOURSELF CRAZY: THOUGHTS ON TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES FOR PLOTTING with Toby Ball (Repeats in the third session)

You’ve heard the buzzwords: three act structure, narrative arc, character arc, pacing, premise, climax, peaks and valleys, outlining, mind-mapping, conflict development, internal and external conflict, and so on. Plotting a novel is difficult work, and bookstores and the Internet are rife with different, often contradictory, advice on how to approach it. This workshop will sort through different techniques and tools that help writers create and manage plot and suggest strategies that have worked for the presenter.

Toby Ball is the author of two critically acclaimed suspense novels, The Vaults and Scorch City. His third novel, Invisible Streets, will be published by Overlook Press in July. He was born in Washington, DC, grew up in Syracuse, NY, and attended Trinity College (CT). He has had stints in journalism (Congressional Quarterly), education (one memorable year as a high school social studies teacher), and nonprofits (the Carbon Coalition among others). He is now the Business Manager at the Crimes against Children Research Center and the Family Research Laboratory at the University of New Hampshire. He lives in Durham, NH, with his wife and two children.  http://tobyball.com

4Z  REVISIONS—YOU DO GET A SECOND CHANCE TO MAKE A FIRST IMPRESSION with Jessie Crockett (Repeats in the third session)

Revisions don’t have to be painful, punitive or procrastinated. In fact, they can be the most creative and enjoyable part of the writing process. In this workshop we’ll discuss strategies and techniques to help you to pull that languishing first draft out of a drawer and to take it to the next level. We will also discuss positive ways to acknowledge and make the best use of your inner critic. Come find out how you can learn to love the second, third and even tenth draft of your work.

Jessie Crockett’s latest novel Drizzled With Death is the first in her Sugar Grove Mysteries series published by Berkley.  When not working on her next murderous adventure, she enthusiastically combs the beach, designs bento lunches, and throws parties. She delights in mentoring young writers at local schools.  Her debut mystery, Live Free Or Die, was the 2011 winner of the Daphne DuMaurier Award for Mainstream Mystery.  www.jessiecrockett.com

4AA  STRUCTURE AS SPRINGBOARD IN LITERARY SHORT FICTION with Mary Elizabeth Pope (Repeats in the third session)

This presentation will focus on one commonly employed structure for a story that conference attendees can follow themselves, providing helpful guidelines to work within, using examples by authors Rebecca Wells, Elizabeth Gilbert, Alejandro Ramirez, and Melissa Bank. This topic comes from years of working with students who find fiction writing assignments too open-ended and desire limitations that ironically free them to be more creative.  

Mary Elizabeth Pope is the author of a collection of short fiction entitled Divining Venus: Stories (The Waywiser Press, 2013, Distributed by Dufour Editions.) Her short stories and essays have also appeared in Florida Review, Sycamore Review, Ascent, Passages North, PMS: PoemMemoirStory, among others, as well as the anthologies The Fourth Genre: Contemporary Writers of/on Creative Nonfiction (Pearson) and Peninsula: Essays and Memoirs from Michigan (Michigan State University Press).  She holds a Ph.D. in English and Creative Writing from University of Iowa, and is currently an associate professor of English and Creative Writing at Emmanuel College in Boston.  http://waywiser-press.com/pope.html

4BB  THE ART OF THE INTERVIEW with Mark Dagostino (Repeats in the third session)

Sitting down for an interview with a perfect stranger — whether it’s an interesting neighbor right here in New Hampshire or one of the biggest celebrities on the planet — should not be a nerve-wracking task! Journalists, authors and writers of all sorts will glean insight into the art of the relaxed, conversational interview style that Mark Dagostino uses to open doors to revealing conversations. Through the example of Mark’s own local history at The New Hampshire Weekly Section of The Boston Globe, his decade-plus spent at People Magazine, and his current career as a co-author of big-name biographies, established journalists and aspiring writers alike will walk away with knowledge they can use to help unlock their own unique interview styles — along with important tips on how to establish an instant, easygoing, trusting rapport with almost anyone.

Mark Dagostino is a New York Times bestselling co-author and a 10-year veteran of People Magazine. From humble beginnings at the University of New Hampshire, an internship at the Derry News, and an early freelance career with The Boston Globe’s New Hampshire Weekly section, Mark parlayed his news-gathering and feature-writing abilities into a decade on staff at the most successful celebrity/pop-culture newsmagazine on the planet—rising from correspondent, to columnist to Senior Writer at People during a remarkable odyssey through L.A. and N.Y.C. In addition to covering the aftermath of 9/11 and The Miracle on the Hudson, Mark had a knack for drawing revealing interviews and establishing trusted relationships with the likes of Donald Trump, Lindsay Lohan, The Olsen Twins, Jennifer Lopez, Justin Timberlake, Rosie O’Donnell, Whoopi Goldberg, and more. Today, he’s proud to write books that cover a wide array of subjects, from Hulk Hogan’s My Life Outside the Ring, to the memoir of 2012 Presidential hopeful, Gov. Tim Pawlenty; from General Rick Lynch’s Adapt or Die: Leadership Principles from an American General, to Love Boat actor Gavin MacLeod’s new memoir, This is Your Captain Speaking. He is currently at work on the gripping memoir of Tonya Craft, the former schoolteacher who overcame a modern-day witch trial of false accusations both in and out of a small-town Georgia courtroom. 

4CC  INSPIRATION, THICK SKIN AND UGLY LUCK: ONE AUTHOR’S JOURNEY FROM NOVEL IDEA TO A PUBLISHED SERIES with Paul Durham (Repeats in the third session)

The road to publication can be a long one, combining frantic stretches of creative energy with extended periods of “wait-and-see.”  Join Paul Durham as he walks you through his three year journey from the genesis of an idea for a novel, to finding an agent and publisher, to a real time discussion of the final days leading up to the April 2014 publication of the first book in his debut series, The Luck Uglies. This workshop emphasizes inspiration as well as some key nuts and bolts of the publishing process. Topics include powering through your first draft; taking a targeted and strategic approach to finding the agent who is right for you; working with your editor and marketing team; and tackling the challenge of drafting a second book in a series before the first has been published. Above all, it is about staying inspired and never losing sight of the most important element of that process—your writing. 

Paul Durham's debut novel, The Luck Uglies, is coming out in April, 2014.  It is the first book in a middle grade trilogy to be published by HarperCollins.  Paul was raised in Massachusetts and attended college and law school in Boston. He now lives in Exeter with his wife, two daughters and an enormous, bushy creature the local animal shelter identified as a cat. He writes in an abandoned chicken coop at the edge of a swamp and keeps a tiny porcelain frog in his pocket for good luck.  www.pauldurhambooks.com  or  www.facebook.com/pauldurhambooks

4DD FROM WRITERS’ DAY TO THE BOOKSTORE SHELF – FINDING YOUR WRITE PATH with Kasey Mathews and Karen Kenney (Repeats in the third session)

Writers Kasey Mathews and Karen Kenney share their own Writers’ Day success stories and will help you find your own way to success. Karen and Kasey are at different points in their own writing careers, representative of the spectrum of writers attending Writers’ Day. They will talk about the successful connections they’ve made through the New Hampshire Writers’ Project and describe how Kasey completed her manuscript and found a publisher.  They will also offer tools and techniques to help participants create their own paths to success.

Kasey Mathews is the author of Preemie: Lessons in Love, Life and Motherhood (Hatherleigh Press, 2012). Five years ago she showed up alone at her first Writers’ Day with a handwritten manuscript and the dream of a published book. That day she and a few fellow writers formed the writing group that would steer Kasey toward an editor, agent, and eventually, a publisher.  www.kaseymathews.com

Karen Kenney is a writer, yoga teacher, and spiritual mentor. Her writing journey began years ago but really flourished when she attended her first Writers’ Day. From there, she attended Ann Hood’s NHWP workshop, where she met fellow writers, joined a writing group, and was encouraged to submit to the Eckerd College Writer’s Conference founded by Dennis Lehane. She’s currently at work on a memoir.  http://karenkenney.com

4EE LEAPING POETRY: THE LOGIC OF THE SURREAL with Andrew Merton (Repeats in the third session)

Wislawa Szymborska writes of a woman in a desperate contest to outlive her own dress. Mark Strand writes of a man and a camel singing a beautiful duet, which the clumsy narrator ruins. Charles Simic and William Stafford write of the inner lives of stones. In one of my own poems a lion in a New England diner talks longingly of the veldt; in another the narrator disguises himself as an inkstand. The spectrum of free verse poetry, ranging from narrative realism through more imagistic and impressionistic work to the surreal, is similar to the spectrum of painting; each type can be lovely and affecting in its own way. To read and write surreal poetry--what the poet Robert Bly calls “leaping poetry”--requires the poet to loosen his or her hold on everyday, linear logic, to let intuition reign. In this workshop, we will read surrealistic poems and explore pathways to their mysterious hiding places in our pscyhes.

Andrew Merton’s book of poems, Evidence that We Are Descended from Chairs, was published by Accents Publishing in 2012. His poetry has appeared in Bellevue Literary Review, Alaska Quarterly Journal, Comstock Review, Silk Road, Third Wednesday, The American Journal of Nursing, The Rialto (U.K.) and elsewhere. His journalism and essays have appeared in The New York Times Magazine, Esquire, Ms. Magazine, Boston Magazine and elsewhere. He teaches writing at the University of New Hampshire.  www.andrewmertonpoetry.com

4FF TEN MISTAKES I’VE MADE IN MY WRITING CAREER SO THAT YOU DON’T HAVE TO with Elaine Isaak (Repeats in the third session)

New writers eagerly look forward to selling their first novel—but are often unprepared for the roller coaster of a writing career: getting and losing an offer, getting and losing a publisher, getting and losing an agent—what else could possibly go wrong? This talk gives first-time and aspiring authors a chance to learn about some of the pitfalls that await on the pathway to publication—and how to avoid them!

Elaine Isaak is the author of The Singer’s Crown and its sequels.  As E. C. Ambrose, she wrote Elisha Barber(DAW, 2013), first of "The Dark Apostle" historical fantasy series about medieval surgery. Elaine quite enjoys her alternate identity, aside from a desire to start arguments with herself on social media.  In addition to fiction, she has written how-to articles for the Writer Magazine, and non-fiction at Clarkesworld, taught at the Odyssey Speculative Fiction Workshop, and spoken to writers’ groups across the country.  Under any name, you still do NOT want to be her hero.  www.TheDarkApostle.com

Additional Options:

Pitch Sessions & Manuscript Critiques

  1. You MUST register and pay for the conference to book a pitch or manuscript critique appointment.
  2. For an additional fee, choose a pitch appointment ($25) and/or a manuscript critique appointment ($100). Limit is one pitch AND one critique per person. To request additional appointments, email amy.nhwp@gmail.com . If there are still spaces available as of February 10th, you will be notified.
  3. A pitch will consist of a 5 minute face-to-face session with an agent or editor to get instant feedback. Please do not bring your manuscript with you to the pitch session. If interested, the agent or editor will give you directions to submit your material.
  4. During a 15 minute manuscript critique appointment, the agent or editor will give you feedback on 15 pages of your manuscript and a blurb of up to 500 words describing your book (this is the description that would be found on a book jacket.) Your submission must be from a single fiction or non-fiction manuscript. Your agent or editor will not read beyond 15 pages, so please keep your manuscript to this length. Manuscript pages must be double-spaced, numbered, titled, in black 12-point Times New Roman font, on white 8 1/2 X 11-inch pages, with a 1-inch minimum margin on all sides. Submissions that do not conform to this format will not be read. Your name and the genre in which you are submitting (fiction, non-fiction, YA, memoir, etc.) must appear at the top of each page of your submission. Compile your entire submission into a single Microsoft Word document—just one document should contain your 15 manuscript pages and blurb. The name of the file MUST be your full name—example: EmilyDickenson.doc. The file must end in a .doc, .docx, or .rtf extension. Email your submission to amy.nhwp@gmail.com . Your manuscript is due by Friday, February 14, 2014 at 5:00pm. By that time, you also must have fully completed registration and payment. We cannot accept manuscripts after the deadline and we cannot offer refunds if you do not submit your manuscript on time.
  5. Once you have made your choice(s) for your agent and/or editor, we are not able to accommodate any changes to your requests.
  6. Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis, so you are encouraged to register early and to research your choice fully.
  7. NHWP reserves the right to make changes to our conference offerings at any time due to unforeseen circumstances, but will always let you know in advance if we need to do so.

CAROLE KITCHEL BELLEW & IB BELLEW – Bunker Hill Publishing

Founded in Charlestown, at the foot of one of Boston’s best-known monuments, Bunker Hill Publishing is an independent publisher with an exciting list covering the arts, photography, science, history and books for the very young. Publishing beautifully designed, high-quality illustrated books at very affordable prices, the company works closely with museums and cultural institutions worldwide as well as with individual authors and artists. Managing Director Carole Kitchel Bellew and Publisher Ib Bellew, with 40 years of publishing experience between them, share a common passion for every part of the publishing process from the first conceptual doodle to the final product.  They are interested in non-fiction, poetry, children’s picture books, and young adult fiction.  www.bunker-hill-publishing.com

KATHERINE FLYNN – Kneerim, Williams & Bloom Literary Agency (MANUSCRIPT CRITIQUE SOLD OUT)

Katherine Flynn joined the Kneerim, Williams & Bloom Literary Agency in 2008. After graduating from Johns Hopkins University, Katherine worked at the literary agency of Nicholas Ellison/Sanford J. Greenburger Associates, Inc. in New York. She then pursued her Ph.D. in History at Brown University, where she is now A.B.D. Prior to joining Kneerim, Williams & Bloom, Katherine edited history books at the publishing company of Bedford/St. Martin’s. She has also taught English literature and composition to high school students and has worked in a rare book shop.  Katherine represents history, biography, politics/current affairs, adventure, nature, pop culture, and the occasional health and fitness topic for non-fiction and particularly loves exciting narrative nonfiction, where the truth is a story more fascinating than anything else. For fiction, she represents both literary and commercial fiction of all kinds.  www.kwblit.com

KATE KAYNAK – Spencer Hill Press

Kate Kaynak is managing editor at Spencer Hill Press, an independent publishing house specializing in sci-fi, urban fantasy, and paranormal romance for young adult readers, with a mission to discover and launch the careers of talented new authors. She’s also the author of the Ganzfield Books: Minder, Adversary, Legacy, Accused, Operative, and Soulmate. Kate was born and raised in New Jersey, but she managed to escape. Her degree from Yale says she was a psych major, but she had WAY too much fun to have paid attention in class. After serving a five-year sentence in graduate school, she started teaching psychology around the world for the University of Maryland. While in Izmir, Turkey, she started up a conversation with a handsome stranger in an airport...and ended up marrying him. They now live in New Hampshire with their three kids, where Kate enjoys reading, writing, and fighting crime with her amazing superpowers.  http://spencerhillpress.com

AMARYAH ORENSTEIN – Laura Gross Literary Agency

Amaryah Orenstein is an agent with the Laura Gross Literary Agency. She began working as an assistant to Laura Gross in the summer of 2009.  She has always been drawn to narrative non-fiction and memoir but enjoys any book that connects the reader to its characters and evokes thought and feeling.  Before joining LGLA, she worked as an editorial assistant at various academic research institutes.  Amaryah, a native Montrealer, earned her BA at McGill University before coming to the US to pursue graduate work. She is currently completing a PhD in American History at Brandeis University.  http://lauragrossliteraryagency.com

REBECCA PODOS – Rees Literary Agency

Rebecca Podosis an associate agent with the Rees Literary Agency in Boston.  She is a graduate of the MFA Writing, Literature and Publishing program at Emerson College where she won the Graduate Program Award for Best Thesis. Rebecca's fiction has appeared in literary publications such as Glimmer Train, Glyph, CAJE, Bellows American Review, Paper Darts, and SmokeLong Quarterly. She is thrilled to read the work of promising new authors, and to represent talented clients like Rin Chupeco, Anna Silver, Ryan Craig Bradford, Mackenzi Lee, Jen Estes, and others. Her interests include young adult of all kinds, literary, commercial and historical fiction, narrative nonfiction, a bit of horror and urban fantasy, and in general, writing with a touch of the unusual.  http://reesagency.com

DEIDRE RANDALL – Peter E. Randall Publisher

Deidre Randall is CEO of Peter E. Randall Publisher, subsidy publisher providing complete services that include editing, indexing, design, layout, printing, and binding for both clothbound and paperback books. The firm also publishes eBooks. Founded in 1970, PER is selective and will only publish work that we feel has merit. Our titles often win awards. With a focus primarily on non-fiction, PER also publishes photography, historical fiction, children’s titles and poetry. Deidre is also CEO of Blueline Publicity, a sister company providing a full array of marketing services for authors and publishers. When not working at PER, she is an award-winning songwriter with two CDs of original songs, “Love on the Loose” and “Passport,”  and a third launching in the spring of 2014 called “Dig.” Deidre is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Portsmouth Poet Laureate Program.